Ethanol Groups Respond to Oil Gripes About E15

The ethanol industry responded today to complaints made by the American Petroleum Institute about the Environmental Protection Agency’s approval of E15 for commercial use.

In a conference call with reporters, API Downstream Group Director Bob Greco presented a “new analysis” of EPA’s regulations which claims “an estimated half of all gasoline station equipment is not compatible with E15” and said that this could result in serious safety and environmental problems for consumers.”

American Coalition for Ethanol (ACE) Senior Vice President Ron Lamberty said it was not surprising to see the oil industry attach E15. “But it is surprising to see them going after pumps and tanks, because most of that equipment has been tested – for decades – using at least 15% ethanol,” Lamberty said. “Underwriters Laboratories (UL) listing for petroleum equipment requires that they pass dozens of tests using fuel that contains 15% ethanol and their listing for tanks and piping defines “alcohol-gasoline mixtures” as any level of ethanol or methanol up to and including 100%.”

Lamberty, who owns and operates a Sioux Falls convenience store, added that the pumps at his station are warrantied for E15, and his tanks and lines are compatible with gasoline ethanol blends. “My biggest infrastructure problem with E15 is that the API-member oil company that supplies my station won’t let me sell it,” he said.

The Renewable Fuels Association noted that the industry is working with all stakeholders to address any safety issues regarding E15, including a website dedicated to E15 information (www.E15fuel.org), a misfueling mitigation plan to help retailers avoid confusion, and an E15 Retailer Handbook for gas station owners seeking to offer E15.

5 thoughts on “Ethanol Groups Respond to Oil Gripes About E15

  1. Pingback: Ag Secretary Urges Oil Companies to Accept E15 - Domestic Fuel

  2. THE TRUTH HERE IS E15 IS A FEEL GOOD AND DOES NOTHING FOR CLEAN AIR IT ADD TO LOW LVEL OZONE AND THER ARE NOW OTHER BIOFUEL SOUCES THAT DOES NOT REQUIRE EXTRA EXPENSES IN THE EXISITNG DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

  3. Monte

    Can I ask where you get your information on ozone formation? Since EPA sets the bar and everyone needs to focus on this, I sometimes have to wonder just how ethanol is tested some times. For every study you say that ethanol raises ozone levels I can find on the shows lower.

    This is an extreme example of testing ethanol but not the base fuel. SAE 2012-01-1273 tested E0, E5 & E10. E5 lowered the ozone-forming potential yet E10 raised the final number. E5 was created by simply adding ethanol to E0 yet E10 was a different fuel all together. How could E10 have a higher BTU value then E0?

    There is certainly enough variation that anyone can pick and choice their own data. Testing does show that if we simply add 5 percent more ethanol for on road vehicles only or higher blends for FFV’s emissions will trend positive. This is sometimes hard to demonstrate from EPA studies since ethanol is usually only tested when simply added to a 93 octane test fuel.

    Especially as we look at the growing concerns around ultra-fine particulates. Ethanol is a clean octane that can improve the quality of the air our families breathe.

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  5. Pingback: API Says EPA Jumped the Gun on E15 - Domestic Fuel