Corn, Ethanol Industries Drive Rural Economy

Screen Shot 2013-01-08 at 11.36.43 PMAccording to a new study released by the Missouri Corn Growers Association (MCGA), the state’s corn and ethanol industries are adding to the state’s bottom line. The study, conducted by the University of Missouri Commercial Agriculture Program, reported that the corn and ethanol industries injected $12 billion into Missouri’s economy from 2000 to 2011. Each year, the state’s ethanol industry utilizes around 100 million bushels of corn to produce nearly 300 million gallons of ethanol and 825,000 tons of distillers grains, a high protein livestock feed. In 2011, Missouri corn production alone added over $1 billion in value to the state’s economy and together the two industries supported 67,000 jobs.

“This research substantiates the tremendous economic benefits corn and ethanol production bring to Missouri,” said MCMC Chairman Jim Stuever, a corn grower from Dexter, Mo. “They are significant drivers for the state by creating jobs, generating tax dollars and increasing vitality of rural communities.”

Over the 12 years studied, the combined benefits to the state’s economy from the corn and ethanol industries were:

  • $12 billion in economic value,
  • $5.3 billion in labor income, and
  • $2.2 billion paid in local, state and federal taxes.

“This is truly a success story for agriculture and the state of Missouri,” noted MCGA President Rob Korff, a corn farmer from Norborne, Mo. “The state’s ethanol industry was built on the faith and dedication of hardworking farm families and support from state leaders.”

During the 12-year period, the ethanol industry yielded a 6:1 return, a net value of over $600 million, on the state’s investment. According to the study, Missouri’s six majority farmer-owned ethanol plants alone generated the following direct and indirect benefits to the state: $734 million in economic value; $416 million in labor income; and $174 million in local, state and federal taxes.

One thought on “Corn, Ethanol Industries Drive Rural Economy

  1. Hey, this is all great news, but I bought a 2011 Chevy HHR, it’s 2013 now and I still don’t have a single gas station anywhere near me that sells E-85! I’m trying to do my part as a consumer by buying eco-friendly choices, but what good does that do the planet if I can’t buy the gas?
    -Mike Zelazny
    Howard, Pa 16841