SunEdison Building NYC’s Biggest Solar Project

sunedisonLogoOne the world’s largest solar energy providers is partnering with New York City to build the city’s largest solar project. SunEdison announced the innovative renewable energy project that will turn a landfill into a source of power.

“Freshkills was once the site of the largest landfill in the world. Soon it will be one of the City’s largest parks, and the site of the largest solar power installation ever developed within the five boroughs,” said [New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg]. “Over the last twelve years we’ve restored wetlands and vegetation and opened new parks and soccer fields at the edges of the site. Thanks to the agreement today with SunEdison, we will increase the amount of solar energy produced in New York City by 50 percent.”

The project, which is scheduled to break ground in the second half of 2015, will consist of two photovoltaic systems totaling up to 10 megawatts (MW) in size, and will utilize between 30,000 and 35,000 high efficiency solar panels installed across 47 acres leased to SunEdison at Freshkills Park. The project will increase the city’s renewable energy capacity by 50 percent and will help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and local pollutants.

“Thank you to Mayor Bloomberg and his team for having the vision to use this 47-acre plot that was once a landfill to generate clean, renewable electricity and also provide businesses in New York with (energy) cost savings,” SunEdison General Manager Attila Toth said at a press conference with Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his staff. “The solar systems we intend to build at Freshkills Park will be tangible proof of the Mayor’s commitment to renewable energy, and will serve as a model of public private partnerships by providing economic benefit to both the city and businesses located within its five boroughs.”

Fresh Kills landfill has been closed for more than a decade and now will be part of the city’s plan to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent by 2030.

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