Clean Energy for Resilient Communities

“Resilient communities need resilient power. Without dependable power, a community can be brought to its knees, and the most vulnerable will suffer the most,” was written in a new report, Clean Energy for Resilient Communities. Based on the success of Baltimore, the report is a blueprint for how a city could become more “power resilient” and details how cities use clean energy to create a more reliable electric system – especially during severe weather events.

To way to achieve this, finds the report commission by the Clean Energy Group (CEG), is to rely on proven distributed energy technologies like solar with energy storage to protect consumers during power outages.

Clean Energy for Resilient Communities“We have entered a new “normal” after Hurricane Sandy, where severe weather events are more frequent, leading to more power outages and increased risk to people and businesses,” said Lewis Milford, President of CEG and co-author of the report. “Last week over a million people in the U.S. lost power during damaging ice storms. Today, due to a record ice storm developing in the Southeastern U.S., hundreds of thousands of people have already lost power, with those numbers expected to rise. We need new strategies like distributed solar with energy storage to protect communities against the harmful effects of power outages. Relying only on the utilities to do the job is no longer safe or dependable.”

CEG said the report is the first in-depth review of national policies and finance strategies to use solar and energy storage to provide more power protection in an urban setting. The report finds that critical public facilities like hospitals, fire stations, gas stations, community shelters and schools should use more resilient power technologies to protect people during power outages. The report also recommends new business models and highlights the emergence of companies that now sell solar with battery storage services to customers– to address the overlooked problem of stand-alone PV systems not working during power outages.

The report recommends:

  • Deploy solar with storage at critical community and government facilities that serve low-income, disabled and elderly communities during emergencies.
  • Promote targeted public funds to increase the use of clean energy in those communities.
  • Use existing bond financing tools to finance solar projects in public and community facilities like schools, community centers and senior housing.
  • Address the existing legal obligations of government agencies under the Americans with Disabilities Act to provide electricity so the elderly and the disabled can fully access emergency services during power outages.

One thought on “Clean Energy for Resilient Communities

  1. Community energy projects are generally defined as those between one and 20 megawatts (MW). This is a sector that is often overlooked when smaller-scale renewables like solar photovoltaics, and larger-scale renewables such as commercial scale wind, receive far more attention.
    The advantage of community energy projects is communities can develop a biomass, waste-to-energy or small wind project themselves, and with local funding, and add significant amounts of renewable energy to their local grid without waiting for outside developers.
    There are many ways businesses and local governments can join forces to build community energy projects.
    AAEC’s product lines can be manufactured in most any community for the local and regional market and exported. This I believe could create jobs and these are among the things we propose offering to an alternative energy hungry world and I’m we are in hopes of finding others who will join and/or support this effort.

    Contact me for more info.

    Les Blevins
    President
    Advanced Alternative Energy
    1207 N 1800 Rd., Lawrence, KS 66049
    Phone 785-842-1943 Fax 785-842-0909
    Email LBlevins@aaecorp.com