2015 Energy Industry Update Released

ScottMadden Energy Industry UpdateThe 2015 edition of The Energy Industry Update has been released by ScottMadden, an energy consulting firm. The report points out as market changes, regulatory processes, and technology evolution unfold, energy and utility companies will face them and adapt. Themed “Changes: Turn and Face the Strange,” this issue surveys a broad array of strategic issues, including:

  • Insights drawn from a first-hand look at developments and lessons learned in Germany. The Solar Energy Power Association and ScottMadden recently partnered to lead a fact-finding mission to uncover the story behind the headlines;
  • A review of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants. The report examines its timeline, implications, and issues in the wake of ongoing political and regulatory activity and a groundswell of comments from all sides; and
  • A view of how utilities are looking with interest at electric vehicles, hoping to increase energy sales and burnish their brands. The report examines customer and vehicle characteristics and some generic business models being tested in this growing market.
  • A review of natural gas prices and gas production from shale formations. The report considers the latest dynamics in this market, including what (if any) impact low oil on which prices are having.

“For months, indeed years, we have been anticipating major changes in the industry from a number of factors—low natural gas prices, technology advancement, and profound regulatory changes,” said Greg Litra, partner and energy, clean tech, and sustainability research lead at ScottMadden. “After being in the distance, they are now on the doorstep, and energy and utility companies are responding to these changes by testing new business models and adapting to or embracing new technologies.”

Report: Offshore Wind Policy Not Working

According to a new report fueled by concerns that the Cape Wind project may never see fruition, U.S. offshore wind policy is not working. “In Up in the Air: What the Northeast States Should Do Together on Offshore Wind, Before It’s Too Late,” published by Clean Energy Group (CEG) and Navigant Consulting, tells the story of how the Cape Wind project is struggling against a decade of opposition. The report concludes the project’s difficulties highlight a larger policy problem—it is almost impossible for a single state to jump start the entire U.S. offshore wind industry.

Up in the AirThe report recommends a multi-state collaboration among states to create stronger and consistent regional policies, financing actions and permitting across the Northeast states.

“Cape Wind was a battle of the wallets, and the fossil fuel wallet evidently won,” said Lewis Milford, president of Clean Energy Group and the lead author of the report. “But there is a larger and more important story behind this controversy. If Northeast states want to reduce the costs of these projects and create offshore wind jobs, they must develop clear and consistent policies across the region, to give developers good reason to build projects here. If they don’t act together soon, they will lose this clean energy resource for decades to come, which will be bad for the economy and the environment.”

The paper recommends the states consider seven multi-state policy areas for regional action.

  1. Regional Offshore Wind Target. The establishment of a practical regional target (or target range) for offshore wind capacity would produce meaningful economic development and environmental benefits by creating a clear demand signal to developers.
  2. Coordinated Policy Incentives. Individual state policy drivers, including any incentives for developers, should be consistent across the region to drive demand and produce cost reductions over time through scale up of the offshore wind resource.
  3. Financing. States should develop new, regional financing mechanisms for regional and single projects, including use of bonds and green bank financing.
  4. Procurement. States should jointly procure power from one or more large offshore wind projects to reduce costs and create a reliable pipeline of demand for project developers.
  5. Economic Development. Coordinated, multi-state, economic development strategies rather than purely competitive action would spur economic development activity in the region through the creation of clean energy jobs and potentially new manufacturing facilities.
  6. Transmission. States should develop joint public funding of regional transmission and interconnection facilities associated with regional projects.
  7. Permitting. It is essential to the success of the multi-state projects that the policies ultimately adopted for permitting these facilities be standardized.

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BioEnergy Bytes

  • http://domesticfuel.com/category/bioenergy-bytes/Mainstream Renewable Power has announced the launch of a pan-African renewable energy generation platform, Lekela Power, that it has formed along with Actis, a global pan-emerging market private equity firm. Lekela Power will provide between 700 and 900 megawatts of wind and solar power across Africa by 2018.
  • Vaisala is providing measurement systems and services to Finnish wind power company, Puhuri Oy, which operates three wind projects and is developing several more in Finland. The agreement includes two Vaisala Triton Sonic Wind Profilers that will be installed in northern Finland, as well as an annual SkyServe maintenance and data management contract. Furthermore, Vaisala will deliver the planning and wind resource evaluation services as part of the measurement campaign to help Puhuri better assess the performance potential of its proposed wind farms.
  • SunEdison, Inc. has announced the completion of a 677 kilowatt ground-mount solar photovoltaic (PV) system that will provide energy for the AT&T materials distribution facility in Lancaster, Texas. The system is constructed using 2,000 high-efficiency SunEdison solar panels. SunEdison is also working with TerraForm Power on this project.
  • Vivint Solar has announced that it has extended job offers to all 20 graduates of the United States Department of Energy’s ‘Reach for the Sun’ pilot program at United States Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton. ‘Reach for the Sun’ is an intensive solar workforce training designed to help place qualified transitioning military service members into the solar industry. ‘Reach for the Sun’ pilot program was offered to 20 transitioning Marines and included 4 weeks of intensive photovoltaic coursework. Each graduate gains the skills to size and install solar panels, safely connect electricity to the grid, interpret and comply with local building code requirements. Additional pilot courses will be offered at United States Army Fort Carson in Colorado and Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia this year.

PG&E Proposes Largest Cali EV Charging Network

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) has asked California state regulators for approval to build out a 25,000 electric vehicle (EV) network throughout Central and Northern California. If approved, PG&E said this program will be the largest deployment of EV charging stations in the country.

The chargers would be located at commercial and public locations, including multi-family dwellings, retail centers and business parking lots. Approximately 10 percent of the chargers would be installed to support disadvantaged communities. PG&E would also provide tools and educational materials for site hosts and customers to learn about the benefits of EVs.

PG&E Electric Vehicle“Our proposed build-out of EV charging infrastructure aims to accelerate customer adoption of clean, quiet, and efficient plug-in vehicles by reducing lingering range anxiety. It reflects our commitment to helping the state of California meet its critical clean air and greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals by promoting cleaner transportation,” said Tony Earley, chairman, president, and CEO of PG&E Corporation.

He continued, “By supporting market acceptance of electric vehicles, it should create tremendous new opportunities for other infrastructure and technology companies, help keep California in the forefront of EV innovation, and create new jobs in local communities across Northern and Central California.”

More than 60,000 plug-in electric vehicles are currently registered in PG&E’s service area, which represents more than a fifth of all EVs in the U.S. The Governor’s Office has called for 1.5 million zero-emission vehicles in California by 2025 to help meet the state’s ambitious goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. To support that plan, industry models suggest that PG&E’s service area will need about 100,000 Level 2 chargers in public locations by 2020.

All of the 25,000 stations PG&E proposes to build would have Level 2 chargers, which provide up to 25 miles of range for every hour of charging. To support travel between metropolitan areas, PG&E would also install at key locations 100 DC fast chargers, which can recharge an EV’s battery in only 30 minutes.

First Solar, Apple Strike Bright Power Deal

A bright power deal was struck this week when Apple committed $848 million to purchase clean energy from First Solar’s California Flats Solar Project in Monterey County, Calif. Apple will receive electricity from 130 MW AC of the solar project under a 25-year power First Solar logopurchase agreement (PPA), the largest agreement in the industry to provide clean energy to a commercial end user according to First Solar.

“Apple is leading the way in addressing climate change by showing how large companies can serve their operations with 100 percent clean, renewable energy,” said Joe Kishkill, chief commercial officer for First Solar. “Apple’s commitment was instrumental in making this project possible and will significantly increase the supply of solar power in California. Over time, the renewable energy from California Flats will provide cost savings over alternative sources of energy as well as substantially lower environmental impact.”

Construction of the 2,900-acre California Flats Solar Project is expected to begin in mid-2015 and to be completed by the end of 2016. The output of the remaining 150 MW of the project will be sold to Pacific Gas & Electric under a separate long-term PPA, and the project is fully subscribed between the Apple and PG&E PPAs.

Calgren Ethanol Biodigester Off and Digesting

The Calgren Ethanol Biodigester is off and digesting waste from dairy farms into ethanol. The ethanol will be used by consumers in California’s Central Valley. The Two-Stage Mixed Plug Flow Digester was designed by DVO, Inc. and built by Regenis. The partners said it is the first California digester to use agricultural waste to create renewable natural gas to power another renewable energy facility, creating a step forward in a virtuous, zero waste lifecycle.

gI_59645_Pixley facility photoThe process begins with local dairy, Four J Farms, sending their cow waste to the Calgren digester, which captures methane and burns it as clean biogas. While Calgren will be utilizing the renewable gas to power its facility, the digester will also greatly reduce bacteria and pathogens so dairy farmers can reuse the liquids (water) safely on their crops.

“I am proud of the contribution that Calgren can make to this incredibly green, low-carbon intensity project,” said Lyle Schlyer, president of Calgren Renewable Fuels. “Digesters are often talked about, but actually building one and getting it into operation doesn’t happen all that often. This is a marriage of industrial and dairy interests.”

The California Energy Commission (CEC) invested $4.6 million in the project. In January 2015, CEC issued rules that could increase the number of digester projects around the state. Today California imports over 90 percent of its natural gas and in 2013 the state constructed nearly half of all the new natural gas-fired power plants built in the U.S. The need to import the energy is fueling the state’s commitment to supporting locally produced alternative forms of power.

“The San Joaquin Valley is challenged with some of country’s worst air pollution,” noted Janea A. Scott, Commissioner at the CEC. “The Pixley Biogas anaerobic digester is the first anaerobic digester on a California farm permitted to use all feedstocks, including municipal green waste and food processing waste. This type of innovative technology helps California meet its clean air, petroleum reduction, and climate goals.”

Nopetro to Roll Out CNG in Florida

The Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority (LYNX) has awarded Nopetro a contract to build and operate a compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations, provide improvements to its maintenance facility and convert the public but fleet to CNG. In addition to fueling LYNX’s bus fleet, Nopetro’s station will also be available to serve private commercial fleets and the public at large.

“Once again, LYNX is at the forefront of the nationwide movement to build sustainable public transportation systems,” said John M. Lewis Jr., CEO of LYNX. “Switching to CNG makes sense both financially and environmentally for Central Florida transit, and Nopetro’s collaboration made an easy choice even easier.”

NoPetro-CNG Fueling StationLYNX has estimated that converting their city buses from diesel to CNG will achieve a return of investment in three years. The fleets are expected to be converted by the second half of 2015. The plan is for LYNX to purchase and/or lease an initial 35 CNG buses and to have more than 150 CNG buses in their fleet within the next five years.

“This partnership will positively impact the 30 million riders who utilize LYNX public transportation services each year, as they travel throughout Orange, Seminole and Osceola counties,” said Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs, Chair of the LYNX Board of Directors. “Converting our buses to run on CNG is part of our continuing efforts to improve operations through innovative technologies.”

Nopetro cites converting to CNG offers more than financial savings to local government agencies. Experts note that switching to CNG cuts emissions drastically, including particulate matter by 89 percent, carbon monoxide by 70 percent, carbon dioxide by 25 percent and nitrous oxide by 80 percent.

Jorge Herrera, co-founder and CEO of Nopetro, concluded, “We are proud to work with LYNX and look forward to helping the agency continue to offer affordable public transportation services while creating a cleaner environment. The switch from diesel to CNG will spur significant savings and position LYNX ahead of the curve across the country.”

BioEnergy Bytes

  • http://domesticfuel.com/category/bioenergy-bytes/The Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) has released, “A Homeowner’s Guide to Solar Financing: Leases, Loans and PPAs,” to help homeowners navigate the complex landscape of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) system financing. The free online guide describes three popular residential solar financing choices – leases, loans, and power purchase agreements (PPAs) – and explains the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as how they compare to a direct cash purchase. It clarifies key solar financing terms and provides a list of questions homeowners should ask before deciding if and how to proceed with installing a solar system.
  • Pattern Energy Group has announced the addition of the 147 megawatt (MW) Mont Sainte-Marguerite Wind project to its list of identified Right of First Offer (ROFO) projects from Pattern Development. The Mont Sainte-Marguerite Wind project, which is located approximately 50 kilometers south of Québec City in the Chaudière-Appalaches region, has entered into a 25-year power purchase agreement with Hydro-Québec. Pattern Development expects to begin construction of the project in the third quarter of 2016 and anticipates reaching commercial operation in December 2017.
  • Mainstream Renewable Power has announced the successful completion of financial close for three wind farms in South Africa with a combined capacity of 360 megawatts. The wind farms, which are all located in South Africa’s Northern Cape Province, represent an investment of approximately US $760 million and are expected to commence construction this month.
  • Coronal Group LLC has announced that it has acquired the majority of the assets of HelioSage Energy and formed Coronal Development Services, LLC, immediately establishing a robust end-to-end solar development solution available to commercial and utility clients in North America. Together with Panasonic Eco Solutions, Coronal owns and operates a portfolio of solar facilities in North America totaling nearly 100 MW. The HelioSage acquisition will add in excess of 300 MW of near Notice To Proceed projects and more than 1.5 GWs of projects in development.

Wind Power Will Help Meet Clean Power Plan

According to a new report released today by the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), adding more wind power to the U.S. electric grid can help the country meet the goals set out in the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan. Carbon emissions will be reduced and the lights will stay on, said AWEA, as wind power is already providing clean and reliable power for millions of Americans.

“Americans want energy security, clean air, and a more reliable energy system,” said AWEA CEO Tom Kiernan. “Diversifying our energy mix with wind helps us achieve all of these goals at once.”

During a press webinar this morning, AWEA Senior Director of Research Michael Goggin walked through the several of the most common questions about wind power and readability that are answered in the report. The report focuses on the 15 most common questions and provides answers drawing on the expertise of grid operators along with other research.

AWEA Wind Energy Reliability Report CoverGoggin explained that as wind energy has grown to provide a larger share of our electricity mix, wind turbine technology has matured so that modern wind plants are able to provide the same grid reliability services as conventional generators. Changes in wind output are not a major issue for grid operators because all power plants are already backed up by all other power plants, and grid operators already deal with large fluctuations in electricity supply and demand. In fact, the gradual and predictable changes in wind power are also much easier for grid operators to address than the large-scale outages that can occur at conventional power plants.

“Based on grid operators’ experience with reliably and cost-effectively integrating very large amounts of wind energy, wind can play can play a key role in meeting EPA’s Clean Power Plan,” said AWEA Senior Director of Research Michael Goggin.

Real-world examples presented in the report help illustrate the significant role wind energy is already playing including in Texas when fossil-fired power plants failed in the cold in February 2011, and more recently did so again across much of the U.S. during the “Polar Vortex” in early 2014.

According to Wind Vision, a new Department of Energy report due for release in early 2015, will show that wind could double from today’s amount to reliably supply 10 percent of the nation’s electricity demand by 2020, 20 percent by 2030 and 35 percent by 2050. However, as stressed by Kiernan during the presser, a long-term commitment to support wind energy by the federal government through programs such as Production Tax Credit will be critical to meeting the goals set forth in the Clean Power Plan as well as the President Obama’s climate change objectives.

Click here to read the full report.

Murphy USA Expands Sale of E15

Murphy USA has expanded its support of E15 with stations opening in the suburbs of Chicago and Houston in 2015. E15 is a blend of gasoline and 15 percent ethanol and is approved by the EPA for use in 2001 and newer passenger vehicles and all flexible fuel vehicles. Nearly 80 percent of vehicles on U.S. roads are approved to use E15.

“We are excited to offer E15 in addition to our existing product offerings. Murphy USA will continue to pursue opportunities to offer the fuel our customers desire,” said a spokesperson for Murphy USA. E15, a blend of logo-murphy-usagasoline and 15 percent ethanol, is EPA-approved to be used by 2001 and newer passenger vehicles and all flexible fuel vehicles. Those vehicles account for 85 percent of fuel use in the United States.

Growth Energy welcomed the announcement. “Growth Energy applauds Murphy USA’s ongoing commitment to bring higher blends of homegrown renewable fuels to the American motorist,” said Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy. “Their dedication to providing the consumer with the best, most cost-effective product is commendable. Furthermore, we are thrilled to see Murphy USA’s success and decision to expand into new markets. Higher blends such as E15 are helping reduce our dependence on foreign oil, improve our environment through reduced emissions and support our domestic economy by creating jobs that cannot be outsourced.”

Buis said that retailers who offer E15 and other mid-level and higher blends of ethanol at competitive prices see increased sales and noted that consumers who use the fuel see better performance.

Clean Power Plan Won’t Affect Grid Reliability

Following the launch of the Clean Power Plan, concerns were raised about how adding renewable energy to the grid would affect reliability. According to a new report conducted by The Brattle Group, compliance is unlikely to materially affect reliability.  The report finds, “The combination of the ongoing transformation of the power sector, the steps already taken by system operators, the large and expanding set of technological and operational tools available and the flexibility under the CPP are likely sufficient to ensure that compliance will not come at the cost of reliability.

Battle Report - EPA Clean Power Plan Grid ReliabilityReport lead author Jurgen Weiss PhD, senior researcher and lead author said that while the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) focused on concerns about the feasibility of achieving emissions standards with the technologies used to set the standards, they did not address several mitigating factors. These include:

  • The impact of retiring older, inefficient coal plants, due to current environmental regulations and market trends, on emissions rates of the remaining fleet;
  • Various ways to address natural gas pipeline constraints; and
  • Evidence that that higher levels of variable renewable energy sources can be effectively managed.

“With the tools currently available for managing an electric power system that is already in flux, we think it unlikely that compliance with EPA carbon rules will have a significant impact on reliability,” reported Weiss.

In November 2014, NERC issued an Initial Reliability Review in which it identified elements of the Clean Power Plan that could lead to reliability concerns. Echoed by some grid operators and cited in comments to EPA submitted by states, utilities, and industry groups, the NERC study has made reliability a critical issue in finalizing, and then implementing, the Clean Power Plan. These concerns compelled AEE to respond to the concerns by commissioning the Brattle study.

“We see EPA’s Clean Power Plan as an historic opportunity to modernize the U.S. electric power system,” said Malcolm Woolf, Senior Vice President for Policy and Government Affairs for Advanced Energy Economy, a business association. “We believe that advanced energy technologies, put to work by policies and market rules that we see in action today, will increase the reliability and resiliency of the electric power system, not reduce it. This report from The Brattle Group confirms that the Clean Power Plan can be implemented without reliability concerns.”

BioEnergy Bytes

  • http://domesticfuel.com/category/bioenergy-bytes/Commissioned by the EU, Wageningen UR Food & Biobased Research is performing pre-normative research into standards for biobased products. Using laboratory research and its knowledge and experience with biobased products, Food & Biobased Research and project coordinator NEN are looking into the demand for specific labelling for and consumer information on biobased products. The project includes a total of 14 European research institutes and companies. Food & Biobased Research is performing specific research into quality requirements for biobased products based on laboratory tests into specific functional characteristics such as strength, flexibility, permeability, recyclability and organic degradability.
  • Scatec Solar ASA has entered into financing agreements totaling $157 million for construction of a 104 MW(dc) Red Hills solar power plant in Utah. When complete, the Red Hills solar project will be Scatec Solar’s largest developed and constructed project in North America. Total investment for the plant is estimated at $188 million with Google providing tax equity, Prudential Capital Group providing debt financing, and Scatec Solar providing sponsor equity. The power plant will be wholly-owned by a partnership jointly owned by Google and Scatec Solar.
  • TXU Energy is helping more of its customers go 100 percent green for their home electricity service. The company’s new TXU Energy GreenUpS option allows existing residential customers to maintain their current TXU Energy plans and benefits while adding renewable energy offsets for 100 percent of the electricity delivered to their homes. That means that for every kilowatt delivered to their homes, an equal number of kilowatts generated by Texas wind will be put onto the Texas electricity grid.
  • Duke Energy has signed 20-year agreements with three solar developers to purchase up to 20 megawatts of solar power for its Indiana customers. The company has filed a request with the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission to approve the agreements. Pending regulatory approval, the developers will build and operate four solar panel projects, each producing up to 5 megawatts of electric power. The projects include: Pastime Farm LLC in Clay County and McDonald Solar LLC in Vigo County, developed by Solexus Development and Strata Solar; Geres Energy LLC in Howard County, developed by Inovateus Solar; and Sullivan Solar LLC in Sullivan County, developed by juwi solar.

DOE Commits $13M in Community Solar Funds

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has allocated $13 million in funding as part of the Solar Powering America by Recognizing Communities (SPARC) program. The funds are designed to aid communities in reducing market and policy barriers to solar deployment and also recognize communities for taking solar initiatives. The DOE believes the program will make it faster, cheaper and easier for Americans to install affordable solar energy systems and spur solar development.

SPARC funding will establish a national recognition and technical assistance program for local governments to help them more effectively and efficiently deploy solar energy. Funding recipients will establish and administer a national recognition program and also SPARC iconprovide technical assistance and share best practices with communities seeking national recognition for cutting red tape and improving local solar market conditions.

Once the program is established, says DOE, communities that participate in SPARC will gain access to a network of nationally recognized leaders and receive expert assistance and national distinction while supporting local efforts to spur solar market growth and deploy solar energy faster and cheaper. Find more information about this funding opportunity, including application requirements.

This funding opportunity builds on the work of the Energy Department’s SunShot Initiative to support innovative, locally-driven solutions for cutting the “soft costs” of solar energy—often caused by delays in permitting, inspection, and interconnection—to build markets that support solar businesses, lower costs for consumers, and increase solar deployment. This announcement comes on the heels of DOE’s $59 million funding announcement to support solar energy acceleration and $14 million commitment to help communities develop multi-year solar deployment plans to install solar electricity in homes, businesses, and communities.

Amazon Web Services Using Wind in Indiana

Amazon Web Services has announced it will power its Benton County, Indiana facility with 150 MW wind farm coined the Amazon Web Services Wind Farm (Fowler Ridge). Pattern Energy has been selected to support the construction and Screen Shot 2015-02-11 at 12.11.11 PMoperation of the wind farm that is expected to be in operation as early as January of 2016. The wind farm will generate nearly 500,000 megawatt hours per year and will be used to power both current and future AWS Cloud datacenters.

“Amazon Web Services Wind Farm (Fowler Ridge) will bring a new source of clean energy to the electric grid where we currently operate a large number of datacenters and have ongoing expansion plans to support our growing customer base,” said Jerry Hunter, vice president of infrastructure at Amazon Web Services. “This PPA helps to increase the renewable energy used to power our infrastructure in the US and is one of many sustainability activities and renewable energy projects for powering our datacenters that we currently have in the works.”

Pattern Development’s CEO, Mike Garland added, “We are excited to be working with Amazon Web Services and we commend the Company for its commitment to sustainability and its continued pioneering and leadership in cloud computing. We look forward to working with AWS as it progresses towards its goal of using 100 percent renewable energy.”

Tanzania Action Roadmap for Energy Access

A recent two-day workshop held in Tanzania and hosted by the United Nations Foundation’s Energy Access Practitioner Network and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) gathered support of the UN’s Sustainable Energy for All initiative’s (SE4ALL) 2030 objectives delivering access to modern energy services for all. If the goal is met, it will double the rate of energy efficiency and also double the share of renewables in the global energy mix.

Screen Shot 2015-02-11 at 10.46.15 AMHon. George Simbachawene, Minister for Energy and Minerals, urged participants to discuss best practices and ways to meaningfully engage all stakeholders to achieve sustainable energy for all in Tanzania. “SE4ALL initiatives provide a working partnership with governments, parliamentarians, private sector companies, industries, and civil society towards a sustainable future free of poverty,” he urged.

Tanzania, one of SE4ALL’s 14 African current priority countries, is working to overcome challenges in providing access to energy for its entire population. According to the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 2014, 36 million people, some 76 percent of Tanzania’s population, do not have the benefits of electricity to power their homes, support education, deliver health care services, or drive economic development across commercial, agricultural and industrial sectors.

“The UN Sustainable Energy For All consultation provides a valuable opportunity to bring energy innovators and government to focus jointly on policy and implementation solutions to bring affordable and reliable energy services to Tanzania,” explained Richenda Van Leeuwen, executive director, Energy Access, UN Foundation. “It showcases how decentralized renewable energy solutions such as solar home systems and community micro-grids complement efforts underway on conventional grid extension.”

WWF Conservation Manager Amani Ngusaru notes that Tanzania will not achieve it vision of securing a middle income country status by 2025 and other goals unless the energy equation is solved. “Access to clean, safe and affordable sources of modern energy is critical for improving people’s livelihoods, and the Government is keen to adopt a mix of solutions to achieve Universal Access.”