State of the World 2014

According to the State of the World 2014, citizens around the globe have been disappointed by lack of leadership from governing bodies. This has led to the sustainability movement being led by citizen groups, women’s organizations and grassroots movements around the world and these efforts are often in opposition to government and corporate agendas.

This year’s report, published by Worldwatch Institute, marks the organization’s 40th anniversary. The study looks at what governing for sustainability really means. Authors highlight the responsibility of political and economic actors to achieve sustainability measures. They also noted that to be effective, governance systems must be inclusive and participatory, allowing members to have a voice in the decision making process.

SOTW14cover-FinalFront-FIXED“Governments today cannot consistently control themselves because they are decimated by a plague of corruption that devours the public interest in virtually every political system,” said David Orr, Paul Sears Distinguished Professor of Environmental Studies and Politics at Oberlin College and State of the World 2014 contributing author. “Effective government, in its various forms, will require an alert, informed, ecologically literate, thoughtful, and empathic citizenry.”

Authors also examine the potential for improving governance by analyzing a variety of trends, such as local and regional climate initiatives, energy democracy, and corporate responsibility. Several authors posit that sustainability depends on action in both the economic and political spheres; financial industries need to serve as public stewards again; unions can help ensure that the transition to sustainability is socially just; and citizens must take responsibility and empower themselves.

State of the World 2014 co-director Tom Prugh notes, “Ultimately, it seems to us, all governance begins with individuals in communities. Humans are no more isolated actors in politics than they are the independent molecules of mainstream economic theory.”

“Pressure to improve governance, at every level, can come only from awakened individuals, acting together, dedicated to making their communities sustainable places,” adds State of the World 2014 co-director Michael Renner. “From there, it may be possible to build communities in a way that affords every person on Earth a safe and fulfilling place to live, and offers future generations the same prospect.”

EPA Announces People, Prosperity, Planet Winners

Seven winners of the People, Prosperity and Planet (P3) competition were announced as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) 10th annual National Sustainable Design Expo recently held in Washington, D.C. The phase II awards are for innovative and sustainable designs created to help solve today’s environmental problems.

USA Science and Engineering Festival“As we mark the 10th year of the National Sustainable Design Expo and P3 competition, we continue to be inspired by the next generation of scientists and engineers shaping the future of our country,” said Bob Perciasepe, U.S. EPA Deputy Administrator. “These students support a vision for the future that encourages a prosperous economy while seeking sustainable and creative solutions to some of the most pressing environmental and health challenges facing our world.”

EPA’s P3 Program challenges student teams to create designs for a sustainable future while offering quality hands-on experience that brings science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classroom learning to life. This year’s winners were selected from 35 competing teams following two days of judging by a panel of national experts convened by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Each award-winning team is recommended for a grant of up to $90,000 to further develop their design, apply it to real world situations, and bring it to the marketplace.

Winners of this year’s awards are:

  • Cornell University, New York, for designing a low-cost monitor for measuring water quality.
  • Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Florida, for designing an innovative air conditioning system that runs on solar power.
  • Iowa State University for designing a new kind of fabric made with fibers from bacteria and yeast grown in tea and polymers of corn and soy.
  • Purdue University, Indiana, for researching how to improve indoor air quality by using plants grown in the air filter of a home HVAC system.
  • SUNY Stony Brook, New York, for designing and building Poseidon, an ocean energy harvester that converts wave motion into electrical energy.
  • University of Tennessee, Knoxville, for exploring ways to use green oak or “heart centers,” the low-quality part of hardwood logs in U.S. building construction.
  • University of Wisconsin, Madison, for implementing a campus recycling program for expanded polystyrene packaging thereby diverting almost 2000 boxes and other polystyrene material from landfills in 6 months of operation.

In addition to the seven winning team, 17 teams were recognized as Honorable Mentions for their project quality inspiring innovation for environmental solutions.

Concern Over Environment Drops in US

According to the most recent article in Gallup’s Climate Crisis series, over the past year concern over the environment among Americans has dropped. Today, one in four respondents of a recent poll say they are “solidly skeptical” of global warming. The poll found Americans are clustered into three global warming groups. “Concerned Believers” comprise 39 percent and attribute global warming to human actions and are worried. “Mixed Middle” comprise 36 percent and the remainder fall into the category of “Cool Skeptics” – a group that is not worried about global warming much or at all.

Gallup Global Warming Opinion GroupsThrough ongoing polling from a special “cluster” analysis of four questions designed to measure belief and concerns about human-induced global warming, Gallup has found that the rate of “Concerned Believers” has varied but today is in line with 2001 results. During the same decade, the members of “Cool Skeptics” have increased while those aligning with the “Mixed Middle” have modestly declined.

According to results, “Concerned Believers” and “Cool Skeptics” are of different mindsets when it comes to how much they worry about global warming. “Concerned Believers” say they worry “a great deal” or “fair amount” about the issue, while “Cool Skeptics” worry only “a little” or “not at all.” “Concerned Believers” also think media reports about the issue are either correct or underestimated, while “Cool Skeptics” think they are exaggerated. One hundred percent of “Concerned Believers” say the rise in the Earth’s temperature over the last century is due to the effects of pollution, while 100 percent of “Cool Skeptics” say it is due to natural changes in the environment. Finally, two-thirds of “Concerned Believers” believe global warming will pose a serious threat to their own way of life in the future, while 100 percent of “Cool Skeptics” disagree.

Those in the “Mixed Middle” hold a combination of views. Some believe humans are the cause of the Earth’s warming, but aren’t worried about it. Some say global warming is a natural phenomenon, but that it will pose a serious risk in their lifetime. In one way or another, those in the “Mixed Middle” fail to line up with the orthodoxy on either side of the climate science issue.

In the past decade, skepticism has increased, while “Concerned Believers” have recovered to pre-Climategate levels and the Mixed Middle has dwindled. So all in all, what the analysis found is that American’s views have grown more polarized about the issue.

Book Review- Three Green Rats: An Eco Tale

Three Green Rats An Eco Tale book coverTru dat rat. Ok, so if you don’t have kids or hang out with kids, you may not have any idea what I just said. But the three green rat brothers of Tintown’s Broken Bottle Lane encourage us to walk softly and reduce, reuse and recycle in the children’s tale, “Three Green Rats: An Eco Tale“. Written by Linda Mason Hunter and illustrated by Suzanne Summersgill this rat tale is both fun and educational and the perfect book to review on Earth Day (April 22, 2014).

This wonderfully illustrated and highly clever book takes place in Tintown where the protagonist, Uppity Ethel Misrington, the richest rat in town, wants to build a big box store to sell stuff. Her itty, bitty niece Maybelline Burlingame Helena Stu discovers the green pastures and projects of the green brothers (Oliver, Wilbur and Tom, each with unique green skills) and becomes hooked on nature and green health. As a result, she starts to grow. When catastrophe strikes sickly Ethel, with the help of Maybelline and the green brothers, the day is saved and Ethel becomes a convert to living with less stuff and the city follows suit.

With the town saved, and the brothers heroes, shy brother Tom sums up the direction the town needs to take. “Look around, citizens. You are knee-deep in your own trash, held captive by technology, and so caught up in the rat race you don’t have time to think.”

“We are ruining our corner of Mother Earth, creating a place where no living being can thrive. We’ve cut down our tress, poisoned our air, and dumped sewage in our rivers and streams. Three Green Rats An Eco Tale book imageIt’s time to step back and ask ourselves, ‘Is this what we really want for our children?’ We must learn to live simply. We must walk softly upon Mother Earth and stop talking more than we need to survive.”

I luv it people! L-O-V-E it.

I highly recommend this book. Take some advice from the three green rats this Earth Day and learn to walk softly. This is a must read book for both children and adults to get you on the forward thinking path about how to reduce your impact and live more simply. In celebration of Earth Day, win an e-copy of Three Green Rats: An Eco tale. Email me your contact information with the subject line: Three Green Rats and the winner will be announced next week in the DomesticFuel.com newsletter.

Growth Energy Celebrates Earth Day

Today is Earth Day and people from all over the country are doing “green” things to celebrate Mother Earth. Growth Energy is taking today to discuss how the ethanol industry is committed earth_day_2014_wallpaperto improving the environment through the development of biofuels that reduce greenhouse gases.

“Our industry is committed to taking steps to mitigate harmful greenhouse gas emissions that have been shown to be a driving force in environmental damage,” said Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy. “That is why we are committed to producing clean, green, renewable and biodegradable fuels that are reducing our dependence on fossil fuels and are better for our environment.”

Buis notes that the benefits of using renewable fuels such as ethanol are tremendous.

For example, here are some facts about renewable fuels and the policy that promotes them: the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS):

  • As a result of the RFS, ethanol is reducing greenhouse gases by an average of 34 percent compared to gasoline, according to the Argonne National Laboratory.
  • In fact, in 2013, the 13.2 billion gallons of ethanol blended into gasoline in the United States helped reduce greenhouse gas emissions from on-road vehicles by approximately 38 million metric tons, which is the equivalent of removing roughly 8 million automobiles from the road.
  • A main source of air pollution is automobile exhaust. A solution is to add oxygenates like ethanol to fuel. By increasing the amount of oxygen in the fuel, ethanol enhances engine combustion and reduces harmful tailpipe emissions of carbon monoxide, particulate matter, oxides of nitrogen and other ozone pollutants.
  • Just a 10 percent blend of ethanol in fuel reduces tailpipe fine particulate matter emissions by 50 percent, while also reducing secondary particulate matter formation by diluting the aromatics contained in gasoline. This blend also reduces carbon monoxide emissions by up to 30 percent.

“As you can see, homegrown American fuels are truly making a difference when it comes to improving our environment. That is why it is imperative on this Earth Day to impress upon lawmakers the importance of the RFS and ensure they continue to support this successful energy policy,” added Buis.  “We need to continue on the path of innovation, and the partnership between first and next generation clean burning, biodegradable, environmentally friendly fuels, and the RFS is doing just that. We have come so far. Now is the time to move forward, not backward.”

Green Gadgets for Earth Day

What better way to celebrate Earth Day than with some new gadgets?

Got an email this morning from an industrious PR person touting a book called “Fool’s Return” by Lynda Chervil, “a thought leader and green technology advocate.”

Chervil, who studies the science behind green technology, says environmental awareness has ramped up production of affordable goods that can shrink individuals’ carbon footprints. She shares four devices she says would make a nice gift for Mother Earth on her day.

hybrid-lightAmong her suggestions is the HybridLight Solar Flashlight that never needs batteries, “can be charged from any light source, and they always work.”

There’s also the Bedol Water Alarm Clock. “Imagine a water-powered alarm clock that’s loud enough to scare you out of bed! Bedol’s water clocks run strictly on tap water – no batteries, no nothing else.” And the Pama Eco Navigator Satellite Navigation system that helps save gasoline by providing you with the most energy-efficient routes to your destinations, and feedback on your car’s performance.

Last but not least, the iGo Green Power Smart Wall that helps “cut the suck” of the power “vampires” that use electricity whether we’re using them or not – everything from coffee pots to laptops.

Go on – give your Mother Earth a hug today and get a green gadget!

10 Reasons to Transition to Sustainable Fuels

This week is Earth week and Advanced Biofuels USA is asking and answering the question, “Why Transition to Sustainable Renewable Fuels? The organization has published 10 reasons why the country should transition to renewable fuels in a handy handout for use by civic organizations, church stewardship groups, teachers, environmental groups and any and all who are interested in renewable transportation energy.

“By publishing this easy-to-understand handout, we are furthering this educational nonprofit’s mission to promote understanding, development and use of advanced biofuels,” said Executive Director, Joanne Ivancic.

Why Transition to Sustainable Renewable FuelsThe idea came from an honors presentation by biology major Agatha Macairan, an intern from Hood College based in Frederick, Maryland, explained Ivancic. Macairan has been working on an article about why we can’t already buy 100 percent sustainable renewable fuels for all our transportation needs and admitted to struggling with the complexities involved in answering the question so we began to look for a way to simplify the issue.

“So, working together, we came up with these 10 excellent reasons based on her work, her discussions with friends and our additional observations. Instead of asking ‘why can’t we?’ we pose the question ‘why should we?'” added Ivancic.

Why Transition to Sustainable Renewable Fuels?

  1. Climate Change –Recycle carbon. Don’t release “new” carbon from its underground storage.
  2. Energy Security – Peak Oil. We need to prepare for when oil runs out.
  3. Health Benefits – Ethanol can replace carcinogenic aromatics, and substantially reduce harmful emissions.
  4. More Efficient Engines Require Biofuels – Higher octane, higher ethanol transportation fuels. Engine manufacturers can maximize the efficiency of smaller, more efficient engines that utilize high combustion pressures and take advantage of other useful properties of ethanol. Cleaner, lower maintenance jet engines with renewable jetfuel. Less expensive maintenance for biodiesel hybrid buses.
  5. Environmental Benefits – Avoid deep water drilling oil spills, destruction of habitat from tar sands or fracking.
  6. National Security – Military do not have to protect feedstock sources or transportation routes of advanced biofuels.
  7. Jobs – Advanced biofuel production creates local jobs in agriculture, forestry, waste management, engineering, science and biorefineries. Not to mention the jobs which support these with food, shelter and services.
  8. Leadership in Science and Technology– Historically, the basis of economic success. Advanced biofuels is today’s frontier.
  9. Keep your money at home! – Do not spend your currency on foreign energy resources.
  10. Not Under Someone Else’s Control – Lessen foreign energy providers’ power.

 

IPCC Releases Fifth Assessment Climate Report

AR5cover1_275_355_70The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued its Fifth Assessment Climate Report that says the effects of climate change are already occurring on all continents and across the oceans. The report finds in many cases the world is ill-prepared for risks from a changing climate. The report also concludes that there are opportunities to respond to such risks, though the risks will be difficult to manage with high levels of warming.

The report, Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability,” from Working Group II of the IPCC, details the impacts of climate change to date, the future risks from a changing climate, and the opportunities for effective action to reduce risks. A total of 309 coordinating lead authors and review editors, drawn from 70 countries, were selected to produce the report. They enlisted the help of 436 contributing authors, and a total of 1,729 expert and government reviewers.

The report concludes that responding to climate change involves making choices about risks in a changing world. The nature of the risks of climate change is increasingly clear, though the report finds climate change will also continue to produce surprises. The report identifies vulnerable people, industries, and ecosystems around the world. It finds that risk from a changing climate comes from vulnerability (lack of preparedness) and exposure (people or assets in harm’s way) overlapping with hazards (triggering climate events or trends). Each of these three components can be a target for smart actions to decrease risk.

“We live in an era of man-made climate change,” said Vicente Barros, Co-Chair of Working Group II. “In many cases, we are not prepared for the climate-related risks that we already face. Investments in better preparation can pay dividends both for the present and for the future.”

According to Chris Field, Co-Chair of Working Group II, adaptation to reduce the risks from a changing climate is now starting to occur, but with a stronger focus on reacting to past events than on preparing for a changing future.

“Climate-change adaptation is not an exotic agenda that has never been tried. Governments, firms, and communities around the world are building experience with adaptation,” Field said. “This experience forms a starting point for bolder, more ambitious adaptations that will be important as climate and society continue to change.”

Greenercars.org Releases Environmental Ratings

Greenercars.org has released its 17th annual 2014 Environmental Scores with the Smart ForTwo Electric Drive topping the list with the hightest-ever score of 59 out of 100. The vehicle will be rolled out nationally this year. The GreenerCars initiative is part of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE).

2011_smart_fortwo-electric-drive-cabriolet_Softtop_RoadsterThe next two “greenest” cars were the Toyota Prius C and the Nissan Leaf. Toyota’s entire family of Priuses performed exceedingly well, with the regular Prius and the Prius plug-in hybrid nabbing spots #4 and #7. Other top scorers for 2014 include the Honda Civic Hybrid (#5), Lexus CT 200H (#6), Honda Insight (#10), and the Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid (#12). Making its return to the “Greenest” list after an absence last year is the Honda Civic Natural Gas vehicle (#9).

“We’ve had such an influx of hybrid and electric vehicles in recent years that the race to earn a spot on the “Greenest” list is more competitive than ever, particularly for conventional vehicles. It’s encouraging to see automakers investing heavily in eco-savvy vehicles on the whole,” said ACEEE lead vehicle analyst Shruti Vaidyanathan.

New to the list this year is the Mitsubishi Mirage, Mitsubishi’s new subcompact offering for the American market. The gasoline vehicle takes the 8th spot on the list. The only other non-hybrid gasoline model to make the list this year is the Smart ForTwo which placed at #11.

“From the rise in the number of efficient vehicles in car-sharing and car rental fleets to the myriad advanced technology vehicle choices available to consumers, the leading edge of the U.S. auto market is evolving rapidly,” said Steve Nadel, ACEEE’s Executive Director.

In addition to the “greenest” cars, the list also includes “greener choices” and the “meanest” cars as well. The dirtiest vehicle for 2014 is the Class 2B Ram 2500 followed by the Bugatti Veyron and the Ford E-150 FFV Wagon.

CARB Receives Eye on Biodiesel Award

Richard CoreyReceiving the National Biodiesel Board’s Eye on Biodiesel Impact Award for the California Clean Air Resources Board was Richard Corey, Executive Officer.

The State of California continues to serve as a national and world leader in regulations related to environmental sustainability, and the California Air Resources Board is at the heart of those efforts. In January of 2010, Air Resources Board staff successfully implemented the first ever market-oriented carbon reduction policy for transportation fuels, a policy known as the Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Since that time, use and production of biodiesel and other renewable fuels has increased significantly. Californians have since enjoyed the benefits of cleaner air, growth in green jobs, and increased fuel diversity.

You can listen to Richard’s remarks here: Richard Corey Remarks

2014 National Biodiesel Conference Photo Album

New Study: Corn Ethanol Reduces GHG Emissions

According to a new study, that compared the greenhouse gas emission reductions of corn ethanol and those of crude oil production and fracking, corn ethanol’s carbon intensity is declining while the carbon intensity of petroleum is increasing. The study was conducted by Life Cycle Associates and found that the carbon impacts associated with Canadian_tar_sandscrude oil production continue to worsen as more marginal sources of fuel are introduced into the fuel supply.

According to the report, “As the average carbon intensity of petroleum is gradually increasing, the carbon intensity of corn ethanol is declining. Corn ethanol producers are motivated by economics to reduce the energy inputs and improve product yields.”

The study, commissioned by the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA), found that average corn ethanol reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 32 percent compared to average petroleum in 2012. This estimate includes prospective emissions from indirect land use change (ILUC) for corn ethanol. When compared to marginal petroleum sources like tight oil from fracking and oil sands, average corn ethanol reduces GHG emissions by 37-40 percent.

As more unconventional crude oil sources enter the U.S. oil supply, and as corn ethanol production processes become even more efficient, the carbon impacts of ethanol and crude oil will continue to diverge. The study predicts that by 2022, average corn ethanol reduces GHG emissions by 43-60 percent compared to petroleum.

“The majority of unconventional fuel sources emit significantly more GHG emissions than both biofuels and conventional fossil fuel sources,” according to the study. “The biggest future impacts on the U.S. oil slate are expected to come from oil sands and fracking production.” In the absence of biofuels, “…significant quantities of marginal oil would be fed into U.S. refineries, generating corresponding emissions penalties that would be further aggravated in the absence of renewable fuel alternatives.”

The study also reveals several fundamental flaws with the GHG analysis conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the expanded Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2) regulations. Continue reading

Radio Disney Dumps Dirty Energy Road Show

Climate Parents has announced that after more than 100,000 people signed petitions the organization began, Radio Disney announced it will withdraw from a controversial program that promotes fossil fuel extraction to school-age children in Ohio. Climate Parents is a national organization comprised of parents taking action on climate change.

“We are pleased that Disney responded to our request to stop promoting oil and gas extraction to kids in Ohio,” said Lisa Hoyos, Founder and Director of Climate Parents. OOGEEP_FB1However, Disney engages schools all over the country on energy education, and we remain deeply concerned that the company has no policy in place prevent this from happening again.”

Climate Parents worked closely with their partners at CREDO Action, who helped gather more than 80,000 petition signatures on Credo Mobilize.com. In addition to working with CREDO Mobilize, Climate Parents also hosted petitions on MoveOn.org and Change.org to gather more than 100,000 signatures and generate hundreds of social media posts.

“There’s no place for fracking in the Magic Kingdom,” said said Zack Malitz, CREDO’s Campaign Manager. “Disney has done the right thing by refusing to use its brand to promote dirty energy, and it needs to go further say it will never again partner with oil and gas industry groups to produce Disney-themed dirty energy propaganda for children.”

The program Climate Parents was opposed to was called “Rocking in Ohio,” a road show the Ohio Oil and Gas Association created in partnership with Radio Disney. The program engaged school kids in a “game show” type activities that celebrated oil and gas extraction.

“The response has been overwhelming,” said Hoyos. “People from all over the country have spoken out against Radio Disney’s promotion of dirty energy in Ohio. But until Disney takes that commitment nationwide, we will continue to mobilize parents and families to ensure that Disney only promotes kid-safe, climate-safe energy.”

Book Review: How Are You Mother Earth?

Calling people of all ages. I’ve finally found a truly entertaining and educational book about climate change and the environment. “How are you Mother Earth?” written by Gordon Hunter, a scientist, takes the reader on the journey with Katie, her boyfriend Mike and her father when they take Mother Earth to the doctor for a check-up.

Well, it turns out that Mother Earth can’t fit in the door and she doesn’t have the same structure as us humans so they work with Nurse Re Corder and a host of other scientists and How Are You Mother Earth?doctors to develop a check-up just for Mother Earth. While the team hunts down the experts, Mother Earth takes a rest on the lawn outside of the doctors office.

During her physical, they test her age and weight, pressure, respiration and air quailty, dermatology and temperature. Along the way not only are you learning about science in a fun way, but you are also learning about humans’ relationship with Mother Earth.

The health report: Mother Earth is very sick.

The cure? “…a cure would be turning away from fossil fuels and turning to alternate sources of energy such as solar and wind.”

The prescription. Each and every one of us.

How Are You Mother Earth? Is cleverly written, the science is easily understood and the illustrations nicely done. This is definitely a book to read to better understand climate change and the health of Mother Earth.

Listen to my interview with Gordon Hunter here: How Are You Mother Earth?

Win a free copy of How Are You Mother Earth? Send me an email or a tweet with the title “How Are You Mother Earth?” and you contact info. The winner will be announced in next week’s DomesticFuel newsletter.

Senator Max Baucus Unveils Tax Reform Proposal

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-Mont.) and Ranking Member Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) have launched a process for the committee to begin developing a proposal to reform America’s tax code. Over the next several months, the committee will convene weekly to discuss a series of topics and collect feedback from members on a wide range of options for taking on tax reform. The revised incentives are designed to be more technology neutral.

Senator Max Baucus“It is time to bring our energy tax policy into the 21st century,” Baucus said. “Our current set of energy tax incentives is overly complex and picks winners and losers with no clear policy rationale. We need a system of energy incentives that is more predictable, rational, and technology-neutral to increase our energy security and ensure a clean and healthy environment for future generations.”

Ethanol Today reports that information released by Baucus finds that current law contains 42 different energy tax incentives, including more than a dozen for fossil fuels. An additional 10 tax incentives exist for renewable fuels and alternative vehicles, along with six credits for clean electricity. Of these, 25 are set to expire every year to two years and if they are extended, could cost taxpayers nearly $150 billion over the next decade.

The proposal aims to neutralize clean energy technologies, i.e. not play “favorites” as the federal government is often accused of doing. Based on several criteria, tax incentives for all forms of energy would be based on a “cleanliness credit” or determined by a ratio of the greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) of a facility divided by its electricity production.

The incentive would be available as either a production tax credit of up to 2.3 cents per kilowatt hour or an investment tax credit of up to 20 percent. The production tax credit would be indexed for inflation and could be claimed on a single facility for a maximum of 10 years.

orrin-hatchA second incentive outline by the proposal is the clean transportation incentive and would be available for fuels that are 25 percent cleaner than conventional gasoline. The percent of “cleanliness” would be determined by the production process’s lifecycle emissions basis as determined by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The max credit would be $1 per gallon.

Senator Baucus has invited members of Congress, key stakeholders and the general public to provide feedback on the draft. Comments must be submitted by January 31, 2014 (the same time comments for the EPA’s proposed renewable fuel volumes for the 2014 Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Click here for information about the proposal as well as information on how to submit comments.

Abengoa Announces Sustainable Business Prize

International renewable energy company Abengoa has launched the second edition of the Focus-Abengoa Sustainable Business Prize that seeks to recognize suppliers that have demonstrated their commitment and made a contribution to sustainable development.

abengoa-logoThe company presents this award to highlight outstanding actions by its suppliers. It is open to all companies that have been suppliers to Abengoa, or any of its subsidiaries in any country during the last 24 months, and that are implementing or have completed initiatives in the last two years that have contributed to social development and reducing environmental impact. The prize will be awarded in two categories – one for small and medium size companies with less than 50 employees, and another for large companies with 50 or more employees.

The jury for the Focus-Abengoa Sustainable Business Prize will be comprised of Jose Borrell Fontelles, vice-chairman of the Focus-Abengoa Foundation and Abengoa’s International Board, and chairman of the jury; Cristina Garcia Orcoyen, managing director of the Entorno Foundation; German Granda, general manager of Foretica; Jose Luis Blasco, managing partner for climate change and sustainability services at KPMG; and Maria Mendiluce, director of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD).

The committee is looking for projects or initiatives that promote responsible business management and stand out for their originality, innovative nature, impact and leadership.

Companies that wish to participate should complete the form on the competition website (http://sustainability.abengoa.com) and return it before December 11, 2013 to the e-mail address rsc@abengoa.com. When returning the form, please include in the subject line of the email “2nd edition of the Focus-Abengoa Sustainable Business Prize”.

In the 1st edition of the Prize, the jury chose Novozymes in the large company category for its “Life Cycle Studies (ACV)” project, while in the small and medium sized company category no first prize was awarded, although the jury decided to present a runners-up prize to Aislamientos Desmontables S.L. for its initiative, “Environmental control, quality, health and safety in the workplace”.