Ethanol Safety Seminar Heads to Mass

There will be a free Ethanol Safety Seminar held on August 26-17, 2014 in Westfield, Massachusetts. Co-hosted by the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) and Fore River Transportation Corporation there will be a session from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm on Aug. 26, followed by a 10:00 am to 3:00 pm session on Aug. 27. Certificates will be awarded to attendees at the completion of the course, although interested participants should note that registration is limited. This seminar is the last to be funded this season by a Federal Railroad Administration grant through TRANSCAER.

eerc“I’m excited. The RFA seminars offer both rail and emergency response professionals a venue to meet and plan for future events together,” said Paul Ruscio, general manager at Fore River Transportation Corp. “Rail has proven to be a safe and efficient mode of transportation for renewable fuels in the States. Being prepared for potential rail incidents by engaging responders makes good sense for us and our communities. The dialogue that ensues from these seminars creates educated teams that have the means and know-how to handle potential incidents. In my experience, a little preparation and coordination before a team faces a task usually proves beneficial.”

The Ethanol Safety Seminar was developed to give first responders, emergency management agencies, and safety personnel an in-depth look at proper training techniques needed when responding to an ethanol-related emergency. A majority of this training is based on the “Training Guide to Ethanol Emergency Response,” a training package created by the Ethanol Emergency Response Coalition (EERC) that has been distributed throughout the United States and to several countries worldwide.

The course focuses on numerous important areas of ethanol safety including an introduction to ethanol and ethanol-blended fuels, chemical and physical characteristics of ethanol and hydrocarbon fuels, transportation and transfer of ethanol-blended fuels, storage and dispensing locations, firefighting foam principles and ethanol-blended fuel, health and safety considerations for ethanol-blended fuel emergencies and tank farm and bulk storage fire incidents.

RFA Making Inroads in Motorcycle Education

rfa-biker-bobbyConcluding the sixth year of sponsorship at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally and the Buffalo Chip Campground, Robert White with the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) believes they are making some real headway in getting the true story about ethanol to motorcycle riders.

“The education to the riders is actually taking on a new life,” said White. “We’re seeing riders talking to riders.”

ethanol-report-adIn this edition of the Ethanol Report, White talks about a rider who pulled up for the Free Fuel Happy Hours who said he defended ethanol to his friends at the rally who told him it was a bad for his motorcycle. “He said ‘I kinda came unglued on them’,” he related. The biker told him that he had been talked in to using it at the rally the year before, and he’s “been using it this entire last year without any issue.”

In another case, White said a guy with a brand new Harley said he had been told by the dealer not to use ethanol and he wanted to get a response to that. “And I said why would you believe me?” White said. “I didn’t engineer your motorcycle, I didn’t put the parts together, I’m not providing a warranty for that motorcycle.” The man agreed, noting that neither did the dealership, but his owners manual from Harley in fact said he could use 10% ethanol. “Harley’s been doing this a long time, as have (other motorcycle manufacturers) they know what fuel is going to be most prominent, least expensive, highest octane option for these motorcycles, and it’s going to be ethanol.”

White says they are looking forward to next year, which will be the 75th annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, where RFA will having an even bigger presence with an even bigger crowd.

Find our more about RFA making inroads in motorcycle education here:
Ethanol Report on Motorcycle Education

Subscribe to “The Ethanol Report” with this link.

2014 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Photo Album

Listen below to White’s interview with automotive expert Bobby Likis from Sturgis:

RFA Helps Legends Ride Raise Money for Charity

rfa-legends-ride-14The Renewable Fuels Association was once again a sponsor last week of the 7th annual Legends Ride, established by the Sturgis Buffalo Chip to raise money for local charities. Thanks to RFA and rider contributions, they raised $54,800 this year for the Special Olympics Black Hills and the Sturgis Motorcycle Museum & Hall of Fame.

The Legends Ride kicks off the Sturgis Rally with an escorted, scenic ride alongside hundreds of fellow Legends Riders through the beautiful Black Hills, ending up at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip for a special riders-only reception with complimentary food, drinks and special live memorabilia auction. To highlight the evening’s festivities, Legends Riders are treated to a double-headliner concert under the stars at the largest music festival in motorcycling.

At the Legends Ride party afterward, RFA was pleased to distribute Ethanol Fueled With Pride beer koozies and t-shirts to bikers. It was just another way that RFA was able to educate riders about the proper use of ethanol in their motorcycles.

2014 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Photo Album

Ethanol at the Buffalo Chip

rfa-sturgis-14-woodyEvery year that the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) has been a sponsor at the Buffalo Chip Campground for the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally we get the chance to visit with founder and president of The Chip Rod “Woody” Woodruff, and this year was no exception.

Woody is a laid back guy who founded the campground 33 years ago so people would have a place to stay and visit for the rally, at a time when some people in Sturgis wanted to get the bikers out of town. “So, a small group of us decided to look for a place to have a party outside of town,” he said. “This property kind of fit the bill.” After that, the party site grew into a campground and concert venue where thousands of rally attendees gather every year.

A few years ago, when RFA wanted to reach bikers with the positive message of ethanol, they decided to become a major sponsor at The Chip and Woody says it’s been great, especially when RFA started Free Fuel Happy Hours three years ago. “I have two motorcycles and I don’t know that I’ve ever used anything but ethanol (blended fuel),” he said. “There’s continuing to be more acceptance in using ethanol in your bike… and I don’t know why not. It’s higher octane than regular and less expensive. A cheap guy like me who gets a better product for less money, that’s my kind of tea.”

Listen to Leah’s interview with Woody here: Interview with Rod Woodruff, Buffalo Chip Campground

2014 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Photo Album

Motorcycles Fill up on Free E10 at Sturgis

rfa-sturgis14-fuelThe third annual “Free Fuel Happy Hours” sponsored by the Renewable Fuels Association at the Buffalo Chip Campground for the Sturgis Motorcyle Rally was once again a rousing success.

“Obviously everyone has a motorcycle here, but they also have other engines at home, whether it be car, truck, SUV, lawnmower, you name it,” said RFA Director of Market Development Robert White. “The point is we want to talk to them about ethanol and make sure all their questions are answered.”

rfa-sturgis14-whiteWhite says they offered free 10% ethanol blended fuel for a total of nine hours this week over three days, allowing bikers to fill up, get a free Ethanol Fueled With Pride t-shirt, and get their questions about ethanol answered. “We even have people who don’t fuel up because their tank’s already full, but they stop by and talk to us,” White added.

RFA has had a presence at Sturgis for six years now, with the last three offering the free fill ups, and White says word has definitely spread. “They were talking about it on the radio, there’s banners and announcements throughout the campground, and a lot of people say their neighbor camping told them about it,” he said.

White says talking one on one with people allows them to correct lots of misinformation about ethanol out there. “This fuel has been proven for well over 30 years,” he said. “Every engine here in the United States has been built for it, its warranty is covered, and we’re just here to explain the details.”

Listen to Robert talk with Domestic Fuel reporter Leah Guffey who was at the rally this year: Interview with Robert White, RFA, at 2014 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally

See all the photos from the rally and RFA’s involvement in the 2014 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Photo Album

Export Opportunities for Ethanol and DDGs

U.S. exports of ethanol totaled 59.9 million gallons (mg) in June, up 13% from the seven-month low in May, according to a Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) analysis of government data, and the opportunities are expanding.

ace14-geneThat was the topic for the last session at the American Coalition for Ethanol conference this week in Minneapolis and one of the speakers was Gene Griffith of Patriot Renewable Fuels in Annawan, Illinois.

“U.S. ethanol is the cheapest motor fuel in the world, it’s needed and it can be blended in any country for clean air,” said Griffith, noting that the industry will continue to grow and produce more than we need in the country. “We must develop these worldwide markets. It’s not just Brazil, it’s not just the United States, there’s a lot of countries around the world that need our DDGs and our low cost, clean burning fuel.”

Listen to Gene explain in detail here: Gene Griffith, Patriot Holdings, on ethanol exports

ace14-chsClayton Haupt with CHS Renewable Fuels Marketing discussed China import issues with distillers grains, noting that the game has changed considerably since he was asked to do this talk in June.

July 24, it was announced you have to have a government stamp that has to say (DDGS imports are) clean of all GMO traits not approved in China,” said Haupt, noting that the U.S. Grains Council responded that simply cannot be done. “You’re kind of put in an environment today that you’re probably not going into China.”

Listen to Haupt’s presentation here: Clayton Haupt, CHS Renewable Fuels Marketing

ace14-ecoenergyLastly, Chad Martin with Eco-Energy wrapped up with an overall look at export markets.

“Ethanol demand is no longer driven solely by the U.S. blender,” said Martin. “That’s obviously a good thing but it comes with some complexities in terms of import quotas, different specs, different market factors to be considered…things our industry has never really had to focus on until we started exporting both distillers grains and ethanol.” Chad Martin, Eco-Energy

27th Annual Ethanol Conference photo album

RFA Pumping up Ethanol for Motorcycles

sturgis-14-fuelThe Renewable Fuels Association is pumped up to provide some free 10% ethanol for motorcyclists attending the 74th annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally this week.

RFA set up this morning for the Free Fuel Happy Hours taking place from 1–4 pm today through Thursday. This is the sixth year that RFA has had a presence at the legendary motorcycle event and the main meeting place at the Buffalo Chip campground.

On hand to educate the bikers and pump them up with free fuel is RFA director of market development Robert White, who took part in the Legends Ride on Monday morning at the Rally, riding his flex-fuel Harley during the week to promote the benefits of ethanol. RFA sponsored the seventh annual charity ride, which begins in Deadwood, S.D., with the proceeds going to benefit charities in the Black Hills region of South Dakota, including the Black Hills Special Olympics.

There’s a lot going on at the rally, but not much in the way of internet access, so we’ll have more from Sturgis when we get wired!

See all the photos from the rally and RFA’s involvement in the 2014 Sturgis Motorcycle Rally Photo Album

Ethanol on the Road to Sturgis

Fueled with Pride 2014 Motorcycle RallyMany bikes are already rolling into the Black Hills of South Dakota ahead of the 74th Annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally which officially kicks off on Monday. The Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) will once again be there at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip campground to promote ethanol to the motorcycle set. Approximately 500,000 motorcyclists from all over the world gather in Sturgis, S.D., for the week-long rally that offers a unique opportunity to promote the benefits of high-octane, low-cost ethanol.

Robert White, director of market development for RFA, says this year marks the 6th year that RFA has been involved in the annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally and the Free Fuel Happy Hours are back by popular demand, offering motorcycle riders a free tank of E10 93-octane fuel. The fuel is brought in specifically for the rally and riders can receive their free tank at 1–4 pm Tuesday-Thursday, August 5-7. Robert says that they really just want to help educate the riders about using E10 in their bikes.

I’ll be attending the rally this year with RFA and looking forward to the Legends Ride as well as spending time at the Buffalo Chip Campground that turns into quite the entertainment junction where many of the concerts will be taking place. Domestic Fuel will have all your coverage from Sturgis Motorcycle Rally once again. Stay tuned!

Interview with Robert White, RFA

Ethanol Safety Seminars Head to Alabama & Kansas

The Ethanol Safety Seminars are heading to Alabama and Kansas. The first seminar will be held August 7, 2014 at the Alabama Fire College in Tuscaloosa and is co-hosted by Alabama Southern Railroad and the second seminar will be held on August 8, 2014 at Doster Community Center in Prattville and is co-hosted by Autauga Northern Railroad. Tuscaloosa is hosting two sessions: from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm and 5:30 pm to 10:00 pm.
Seminars are free, but registration is limited. Lunch and dinner will be provided. Certificates will be awarded to attendees at the completion of the course.

The Ethanol Safety Seminars then head to Kansas. The first seminar is August 11–12, 2104 at the Overland Park Fire Training Center near Kansas City co-hosted by the Missouri & Northern Arkansas Railroad with sessions from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm. The next seminar is August 13, 2014 at the Webster Conference Center in Salina, followed by the final seminar on August 14, 2104 at Pratt Community College near Wichita. Both will be co-hosted by Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad and both will have morning sessions (9 am- 2pm) and evening sessions (5 pm- 10 pm).

Ethanol Safety Seminar LogoAll seminars are funded by a Federal Railroad Administration grant through TRANSCAER. RFA has been a TRANSCAER member since 2007.

The goal of these seminars is for attendees to gain full ethanol emergency response training experience that they can put to use immediately in the field as well as pass along to other first response teams. A majority of this training is based on the “Training Guide to Ethanol Emergency Response,” a training package created by the Ethanol Emergency Response Coalition (EERC) that has been distributed throughout the United States and to several countries worldwide.

“Rail has proven itself to be one of the safest modes of transportation for hazardous materials over the years,” said Jimmy Patterson, general manager at Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad. “We must be mindful of possible risks, however, and be ready to respond should an incident occur. The Ethanol Safety Seminars provide emergency responders with the training they need to effectively react to a sudden event.”

Attendees will receive in-depth information on proper training techniques that first responders and hazmat personnel need to effectively respond to an ethanol-related emergency. While primarily targeting first responders, hazmat teams, safety managers, and local emergency planning committees, it is also open to the general public.

“The public relies on the nation’s first responders to protect them during the worst of emergency events,” said Kristy Moore, RFA vice president of technical services. “With these seminars, RFA makes sure that personnel receive the training they need to tackle these safety challenges before venturing into potentially hazardous conditions.”

RFA to DOE: Update Your E85 Data!

Today the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) is calling on the Department of Energy (DOE) to accurately account for all stations selling E85. According to RFA, the DOE’s Alternative Fuels Data Center is missing a vast number of E85 stations – nearly 1,000- after comparing the list to the “crowd-sourced” website E85Prices.com that lists 3,449 retail locations offering E85.

RFANewlogo“The AFDC database is way off in its reporting of E85 stations, and this is negatively influencing discussions over the 2014 Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) blending requirements. It isn’t just a handful of stations that are missing; we are talking about the exclusion of hundreds of stations nationwide. In fact, they missed 40 percent of the stations that are included in other databases! That’s simply unacceptable,” said Bob Dinneen, president and CEO of the RFA.

In a letter sent to the DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, the RFA illustrates the central role of the database in crucial policy decisions, stating, “EPA’s mistaken belief that existing E85 refueling infrastructure is insufficient to distribute the 2014 RFS volumes specified in the statute is based in large part on information from the AFDC. As a result, the Agency wrongly proposed to reduce required renewable fuel blending volumes in 2014.”

Dinneen stressed the urgent need for updated, accurate information as the EPA decides the final 2014 RFS blending requirements. He noted, “Accurate data is the foundation of well informed decisions. The so-called ‘blend wall’ — the level at which oil companies claim they can no longer blend ethanol into gasoline — can be scaled through increased use of E85. Therefore, an accurate accounting of E85 stations distributing low-cost, renewable fuels is vital to informing the debate over RFS implementation.”

The letter concludes, “The correctness and completeness of the database has never been more important, as crucial policy and regulatory decisions are being informed by the information. Inadequate data leads to ill-informed policy decisions, which can have significant consequences for affected industries.

Grains Council Working on Ethanol Exports

usgrainscouncil1The U.S. Grains Council (USGC) is working on promoting exports of U.S. ethanol through a partnership between USDA’s Foreign Agriculture Service, Growth Energy and the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA).

“We’ve been working since late March, early April to determine which markets we’re going to do market assessments in and then next year we’ll shift into market development activities,” said Ashley Kongs, USGC manager of ethanol export program. The Grains Council is planning three regional market assessment programs this year, going to Japan and Korea in September, Latin America in November, and southeast Asia in early December.

Earlier this year, USGC participated in a trade mission to China with USDA Undersecretary Michael Scuse where they were able to discuss the possibility of ethanol exports to that country. “They visited with a Chinese ethanol plant and they had meetings with the National Energy Administration in China,” said Kongs. “Currently ethanol can only be sold in six designated markets in China for blending with fuel, but the group had discussions about the possibility of expanding ethanol use nationwide.” Kongs says while there are challenges in the Chinese market, the Grains Council sees great potential for the future to open the door for U.S. ethanol exports.

USGC continues to build on its success in promoting exports of the ethanol co-product distillers grains and will be again this year joining RFA in hosting the Export Exchange, an international trade conference focused on the export of U.S. coarse grains and ethanol co-products held every two years. Early registration for the event is open until July 31 and USGC and RFA members are eligible for discounted pricing.

Ethanol Report on Cost Analysis

ethanol-report-adA new analysis by the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) shows that over the past four years, ethanol has been the most economically competitive motor fuel and octane source in the world.

rfa-cooper-headIn this Ethanol Report, RFA Senior Vice President Geoff Cooper gives some of the major findings of the report, talks about why it has particular relevance in the California market, and how the study suggests that the cost of producing ethanol in the US will continue to fall.

Ethanol Report on Cost Analysis

Subscribe to “The Ethanol Report” with this link.

What is the Difference Between Crude Oil & Ethanol?

RFANewlogoThe U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has released a new tank car proposal that is designed to enhance the safe transportation of hazardous materials, including ethanol and crude oil. Bob Dinneen, CEO and president of the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) expressed concern over the rule’s same treatment of crude oil and ethanol when ethanol has a strong safety record while the high volatility of crude oil from the Bakken is not adequately addressed.

However, Dinneen did applaud the Administration for adopting a comprehensive approach to increasing concerns about rising shipments of highly volatile crude oil on the nation’s railways. He noted that the approach outlined today appears to address prevention, mitigation and response related to crude oil derailments.

“Ethanol is a low volatility, consistent commercial product with a 99.997 percent rail safety record,” said Dinneen. “Unlike oil from fracking, ethanol is not a highly volatile feedstock of unknown and differing quality and characteristics being shipped to a refinery for commercial use. Before this proposed rule is finalized, the RFA looks forward to engaging the Department of Transportation in a constructive dialogue about these differences, and the need to have a practical and effective phase-in of these new standards,” added Dinneen. “In the meanwhile, the U.S. ethanol industry will continue to work with all parties to assure the safe and effective transport of this low-cost, domestic renewable fuel to markets all across the country.”

Ethanol Revving up for Sturgis Rally

sturgis-rfaFor the sixth year in a row, motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world will be able to learn more about ethanol, courtesy of the Renewable Fuels Association, at the famous Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.

About a half million motorcyclists will be converging on Sturgis, S.D., August 4-7 for the 74th annual Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, presenting an ideal opportunity for RFA to dispel misinformation concerning ethanol use in motorcycles. Among the ways RFA does that is “Free Fuel Happy Hours,” offering a free tank of E10 93-octane fuel to riders at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip campground. RFA is a major sponsor at the popular campground where the message “Ride Safe, Fuel Right” will be seen everywhere, including the main stage where this year’s concert line up includes Lynyrd Skynyrd, Collective Soul, Zac Brown Band, John Mayall, Alice Cooper, ZZ Top and Cheap Trick.

RFA also proudly sponsors the annual “Legends Ride” where proceeds are donated to local charities, including the Black Hills Special Olympics. All “Legends Ride” participants receive free “Fueled with Pride” giveaways and informational materials on ethanol before they embark on the ride that originates in Deadwood, S.D.

DomesticFuel will once again be there to bring all the sights and sounds to you. Check out last year’s photo album here.

Analysis: Ethanol Most Competitive Motor Fuel

According to a new analysis released today, “The Economic Competitiveness of U.S. Ethanol,” U.S. produced ethanol has been the most economically competitive motor fuel in the world over the past four years. In addition, ethanol has played an important role in E-85 fill-up photo Joanna Schroederreducing consumer fuel costs. The analysis was conducted by ABF Economics and released by the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA).

The analysis reviewed actual wholesale prices paid for ethanol, gasoline and alternative octane source in several U.S. and world markets between 2010-2013. Based on the data, the report concluded, “…U.S.-produced ethanol is an exceptionally competitive additive and fuel source…” and that “…U.S. ethanol has emerged as the lowest cost transportation fuel and octane source in the world over the past several years.”

Commenting on the analysis, RFA President and CEO Bob Dinneen said, “As proven by the recent boom in exports, American-made ethanol has evolved into the most cost competitive transportation fuel and octane source in the world. Through rapid technology adoption and innovation, U.S. producers have proudly earned the distinction of being the global leader and low-cost producer of clean-burning, renewable ethanol.”

Dinneen continued, “Despite the fact that ethanol offers greater consumer choice at a lower cost, entrenched petroleum companies continue to erect barriers that deny access to larger volumes of renewable fuels,” Dinneen continued. “In a truly free market, consumers would always choose a fuel that is produced domestically, is better for the environment and climate, and costs much less than gasoline. Unfortunately, free markets only exist in text books, underscoring the need for monopoly-breaking policies like the Renewable Fuel Standard.”

The ABF Economics study found that even after accounting for transportation costs to the reference markets of Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York, “The ‘spread’ between ethanol and RBOB [gasoline] has averaged 30 to 40 cents per gallon over the past four years in these three key markets and the difference averaged more than 60 cents per gallon in 2012.

As a result of this cost differential, the analysis found “…ethanol blended with RBOB to produce reformulated gasoline at a 10 percent (E10) blend has reduced the cost of motor fuel to consumers.” The analysis found that ethanol’s impact on gas prices goes far beyond the wholesale price spread: “This does not include the additional downward impact ethanol has on gasoline prices as a result of extending supplies and reducing demand for crude oil.”

Economic Competitiveness of Ethanol reportAccording to the report, “…even with depreciation of the real, U.S. ethanol has been more cost competitive than Brazilian ethanol in key U.S. and world markets over the past several years.” This has particular relevance in the California market, according to the study, because that state’s fuel policies strongly compel fuel suppliers to import Brazilian ethanol in lieu of U.S. ethanol. “Use of Brazilian ethanol in place of U.S. ethanol theoretically raised the price of E10 for California consumers by 8 cents per gallon over the past four years,” the study found.

In closing, the study indicates that the competitiveness of U.S. ethanol will only improve in the future: “This competitive advantage is expected to increase further, as U.S. ethanol and feedstock producers adopt new technologies and crude oil prices continue to trend higher.”